Working together with parents

The most important resource available to help you make Scouting an exciting and meaningful experience for neurodiverse Scouts is their own parents or caregivers. While you may not feel a need to engage too much with the parents of some Scouts, having a strong working relationship with caregivers is vital when a neurodiverse Scout mightContinue reading “Working together with parents”

The Golden Rule of Inclusion

When modifying an activity or a program, it’s easy to become concerned about making it accessible to everyone, even those who aren’t participating. While we do need to ensure that every young person who wants to be part of Scouting can, don’t make any more modifications than are necessary to ensure everyone can be involved.Continue reading “The Golden Rule of Inclusion”

Changing Scout Groups

As your child grows and moves through the sections of Scouting, you may find that a Scout Group which was previously suitable is no longer providing a fun and enriching experience for your child. You may find that there has been a change in adult leadership, or that an older section may operate very differentlyContinue reading “Changing Scout Groups”

Teddy Bears on Camp

For many reasons, it’s not unusual for neurodiverse children to have a strong attachment to a favourite soft toy, teddy bear, special blanket or pillow. These objects can be calming and provide a sense of security well after the age most children are generally expected to grow out of this kind of attachment. Peer pressureContinue reading “Teddy Bears on Camp”

Choosing a neurodiversity-friendly Scout group

Just like schools, every Scout group is different: It may be wise to try several Scout groups before choosing one to stay at.  Some Scout Leaders and groups have extensive experience with neurodiverse Scouts. Others may think they don’t have any at all (although it’s likely this isn’t quite accurate – they may have justContinue reading “Choosing a neurodiversity-friendly Scout group”